Sorry Lyrics Chinese Democracy Guns N Roses

Sorry Lyrics Chinese Democracy Guns N Roses

Sorry is a new song by Axl Rose for the new GNR album, Chinese Democracy.

A lot of people are speculating that this song is directed at former Gunner, Slash.
Can't see it my self, while Chinese Democracy might have a lot of introspection, this song could be interpreted in soooo many situations. Still, if it makes you happy go right ahead and read it how you want - that's how many artists intend their lyrics to be interpreted.

Sorry Lyrics - credits W. Axl Rose/Buckethead/Brain/Pete Scaturro

You like to hurt me
You know that you do
You like to think
In some way
That it's me
And not you
(But we know that isn't true)

You like to have me
Jump an' be good
But I… don't want to do it

You don't know why
I won't act the way
You think I should

You thought they'd make me
Behave and submit

What were you thinking
'Cause I don't forget

You don't know why
I won't give in
To hell with the pressure
I'm not cavin' in

You know that I
Got under your skin
You sold your soul
But I won't let you win

You talk too much
You say I do
Difference is nobody cares about you

You've got all the answers
You know everything
Why nobody asked you
It's a mystery to me

I'm sorry for you
Not sorry for me
You don't know who in the hell to
Or not to believe

I'm sorry for you
Not sorry for me
You don't know who you can trust now
Or you should believe
You should believe
You don't know who you can trust now
Or you should believe

You close your eyes
All well an' good
I'll kick you ass
Like I said that I would

You tell them stories they'd rather believe
Use and confuse them
They're numb and naïve

The truth is the truth hurts
Don't you agree?

It's harder to live
With the truth about you
Than to live with
The lies about me

Nobody owes you
Not one goddamn thing
You know where to put your
'Just shut up and sing'

I'm sorry for you
Not sorry for me
You don't know who in the hell to
Or not to believe
I'm sorry for you
Not sorry for me
You chose to hurt those that love you
An' won't set them free
Won't set them free
You chose to hurt those that love you
An' won't set them free

You don't need
Anyone else to be
Sorry for you
You've got no heart
You can't see
All that you've done for me
I know the reasons
You tear me apart


Players on Sorry

Vocals: W. Axl Rose
Guitars: Buckethead, Robin Finck, Ron Thal
Acoustic Guitar: Robin Finck
Guitar Solo: Buckethead
Bass: Tommy Stinson
Keyboards: Pete Scaturro, Chris Pitman
Background Vocals: Sebastian Bach
Sub bass: Chris Pitman
Drums: Brain Mantia

Halo Fan? Check out Gears of Halo or maybe some U2 lyrics by Bono?

Chinese Democracy Review by Rolling Stone Magazine

Rolling Stone Magazine Reviews GNR's Chinese Democracy

Let's get right to it: if any critic is going to give a fair assessement of GNR's Chinese Democracy, you can be pretty confident that Rolling Stone Magazine will do the business for you. See their The Spaghetti Incident? review. Getting long term Rolling Stoner David Fricke to do the writing gives even greater confidence....

By David Fricke

Let's get right to it: The first Guns n' Roses album of new, original songs since the first Bush administration is a great, audacious, unhinged and uncompromising hard-rock record. In other words, it sounds a lot like the Guns n' Roses you know. At times, it's the clenched-fist five that made 1987's perfect storm, Appetite for Destruction; more often, it's the one sprawled across the maxed-out CDs of 1991's Use Your Illusion I and II, but here compressed into a convulsive single disc of supershred guitars, orchestral fanfares, hip-hop electronics, metallic tabernacle choirs and Axl Rose's still-virile, rusted-siren singing.

If Rose ever had a moment's doubt or repentance over what Chinese Democracy has cost him in time (13 years), money (14 studios are listed in the credits) and body count — including the exit of every other founding member of the band — he left no room for it in these 14 songs. "I bet you think I'm doin' this all for my health," Rose cracks through the saturation-bombing guitars in "I.R.S.," one of several glancing references on the album to what he knows a lot of people think of him: that Rose, now 46, has spent the last third of his life running off the rails, in half-light. But when he snaps, "All things are possible/I am unstoppable," in the thumper "Scraped," that's not loony hubris — just a good old rock & roll "fuck you," the kind that made him and the old band hot and famous in the first place.

chinese democracy album cover picture

Something else Rose broadcasts over and over on Chinese Democracy: Restraint is for suckers. There is plenty of familiar guitar firepower — the stabbing-dagger lick that opens the first track, "Chinese Democracy," the sand-devil fuzz in "Riad N' the Bedouins" and the looping squeals over the grand anguish of "Street of Dreams." But what Slash and Izzy Stradlin used to do with two guitars now takes a wall of 'em. On some tracks, Rose has up to five guys — Robin Finck, Buckethead, Paul Tobias, Ron "Bumblefoot" Thal and Richard Fortus — riffing and soloing in broad, saw-toothed blurs. And that's no drag. I still think the wild, superstuffed "Oh My God" — the early Chinese Democracy track wasted on the 1999 End of Days soundtrack — beats everything on Guns n' Roses' 1993 covers album, The Spaghetti Incident?

Most of these songs also go through multiple U-turns in personality, as if Rose kept trying new approaches to a hook or a bridge and then decided, "What the hell, they're all cool." "Better" starts with what sounds like hip-hop voicemail — severely pinched guitar, drum machine and a near-falsetto Rose ("No one ever told me when/I was alone/They just thought I'd know better") — before blowing up into vintage Sunset Strip wallop. "If the World" has Buckethead plucking acoustic Spanish guitar over a blaxploitation-film groove, while Rose shows that he still holds a long-breath vowel — part torture victim, part screaming jet — like no other rock singer.

And there is so much going on in "There Was a Time" — strings and Mellotron, a full-strength choir and Rose's overdubbed sour-growl harmonies, wah-wah guitar and a false ending (more choir) — that it's easy to believe Rose spent most of the past decade on that arrangement alone. But it is never a mess, more like a loud mass of bad memories and hard lessons. In the first lines, Rose goes back to a beginning much like his own — "Broken glass and cigarettes/ Writin' on the wall/It was a bargain for the summer/An' I thought I had it all" — then piles on the wreckage along with the orchestra and guitars. By the end, it's one big melt of missing and kiss-off ("If I could go back in time . . . But I don't want to know it now"). If this is the Guns n' Roses that Rose kept hearing in his head all this time, it is obvious why two guitars, bass and drums were never going to be enough.

It is plain, too, that he thinks this Guns n' Roses is a band, as much as the one that recorded "Welcome to the Jungle," "Sweet Child O' Mine," "Used to Love Her" and "Civil War." The voluminous credits that come with Chinese Democracy certainly give detailed credit where it is due. My favorite: "Initial arrangement suggestions: Youth on 'Madagascar." Rose takes the big one — "Lyrics N' Melodies by Axl Rose" — but shares full-song bylines with other players on all but one track. Bassist Tommy Stinson plays on nearly every song, and keyboardist Dizzy Reed, the only survivor from the Illusion lineup, does the Elton John-style piano honors on "Street of Dreams."

But Rose still sings a lot about the power of sheer, solitary will even when he throws himself into a bigger fight, like "Chinese Democracy." In "Madagascar," which Rose has played live for several years now, he samples both Dr. Martin Luther King's "I have a dream" speech and dialogue from Cool Hand Luke. And at the end of the album, on the bluntly titled "Prostitute," Rose veers from an almost conversational tenor, over a ticking-bomb shuffle, to five-guitar barrage, orchestral lightning and righteous howl: "Ask yourself/Why I would choose/To prostitute myself/To live with fortune and shame." To him, the long march to Chinese Democracy was not about paranoia and control. It was about saying "I won't" when everyone else insisted, "You must." You may debate whether any rock record is worth that extreme self-indulgence. Actually, the most rock & roll thing about Chinese Democracy is he doesn't care if you do.